Tag Archives: ProShow

Tools For ProShow (Update)

ProShow has considerable capability to which Photodex does not provide direct access. That is the domain of the expert, according to Photodex. So, if you want to access that capability, if you even know it exists, you are on your own. Tools For ProShow provide access to much of that capability. ProShow’s cropping tool is minimalistic. Its outlining capabilities are very limited and have not changed much since the program was first introduced. The rotate center function, first introduced in version 4, was meant to allow the rotation of a layer on something other than layer center. Photodex’s implementation provided access to points only within the layer boundaries. First introduced around mid-April 2010, the function has not changed since then. The program doesn’t tell you how wide or tall your layer is. That is something you must figure out for yourself, if you know how. When you rotate a layer on a rotate center value, ProShow does not tell you where that layer really is. The layer’s pan setting is based on where the layer’s center is … unless the layer is rotated off around a point that is different than layer center. The result is a misreported layer position. Sometimes it’s important to know exactly where that rotated layer is located.

Tools for ProShow addresses all of these issues and then some. When first introduced, there were only 9 tools in the toolkit. Now, there are over 25 different tools. Many of the tools are usable in both ProShow Gold and Producer. Only those tools related to modifiers or the case where a change in zoom occurs in each axis are not applicable. In fact, the Layer: Outlines/Frames tool provides the means to use graphics as outline layers similar to what Producer can do natively. It also gives tools to create a graphic that works as a frame. The outlining capability within Gold is next to useless.

I released a new version near the end of June. That was v11.21. I continued making various changes. 88 changes later, v11.33a was released. Some of the changes were cosmetic. Others were a re-working of the equations to provide more accurate information over a more diverse range of settings. For others, the tools were enhanced, becoming more robust. Many changes were under the hood changes.

A new tool was provided to tell how much space is to each side of a layer.

The Layer Outlines/Frames was significantly reworked. It should prove easier to use and understand. The Cropping tool was enhanced slightly. The Findings tools of Cover Layer during Rotation and Largest Width during rotation were reworked considerably. They now work for all scales and layer aspects. The Width & Height, Zoom tool was enhanced slightly.

Each layer has an angle that provides the widest presentation on the screen. This information depends upon the layer’s aspect. That information is now provided in the Layer: Aspect/Dimensions section and the Layer: Outlines/Frames tools. You never know when that information might prove helpful.

I hope you find the toolkit found in Tools For ProShow useful.

Dale
170722-2235

Tools For ProShow (Update)

For the past few months I’ve been working on my Tools for ProShow on and off. As I was doing this, one change, improvement, or tweak led to another. All in all, the Tools for ProShow are an even more useful tool than they were previously for those wanting to take advantage of capabilities within ProShow that Photodex does not provide to its customers. For those of you who don’t know it, ProShow has considerable capability that Photodex hasn’t provided a framework that allows you to take advantage of it. Its cropping feature is weak. Its outline and shadow creation features are poor. Its Rotate Center feature has a very limited implementation of what it’s capable of doing. Right now, as long as you keep the Rotate Center values within the boundaries of the layer, you can make somewhat effective use of the feature. However, that does not mean you can specify your own rotation location on the screen … just within the layer’s boundaries. ProShow tells you little about a layer’s width and height. This is information that could be helpful in proper positioning of your layers on or off of the slide. ProShow does not document its modifiers or the functions that the modifiers use. While I don’t either, at least I provide the means to effectively use the Quadratic Curve and Linear Ramp functions. Captions or the Text on Text Layers use a different positioning method than layers use. Specific positioning of the text relative to a layer can prove confusing, if not daunting, if accuracy in positioning is important. ProShow provides no bridge between the two. ProShow provides you with timing information but provides no means to determine time between various points within the slideshow. This is all addressed in the Tools for ProShow … and then some.

Tools for ProShow is an Excel Worksheet that performs calculations that let you do things in ProShow once thought impossible, very difficult, or labor intensive. These tools started their life when I first discovered the relationships between Pan, Zoom, and Rotate Center in June 2011.

 Tools For ProShow Enhancements/Changes.


The Tools worksheet has been updated. It has a release version of 10.15e. Extensive revisions, enhancements, or tweaks of many of the tools has occurred since the last update.

The Equal Size Changes tool was renamed LAYER: Outlines/Frames. This tool was extensively revised. The tool is used to create the appearance of an outline or frame around another layer. One enhancement was the ability to specify the width of the outline on each layer’s side. This width is applied to each layer’s side. A second enhancement was that the layer’s aspect is now selected from a dropdown list of defined aspects as well the three original layers given in the Layer Information tool. A third enhancement was the ability to give the layer a Polaroid outline. That is, equal sized outline widths on three sides and a very wide outline width on the fourth side. A fourth enhancement was that the number of modifier-based zoom changes was changed from three to six. A fifth enhancement involved the Aspect, Effective section. A user defined Aspect, Effective End layer was included. This extends this tool’s usefulness to ProShow Gold. With the ability to use a layer with a size specified by the user, cropping or editing it in a graphical editor becomes even easier than previously possible.

Findings: Calculated Settings. The calculations for the layer zoom and width were extensively revised for improved speed and reduced resources. A few calculation errors related to the safe zone were also corrected.

Findings: Formulae. Removed. In its place were two new tools: Largest Width During Rotation and Cover Layer During Rotation.

The Largest Width During Rotation calculates the largest width of the layer during its rotation at the currently entered zoom setting.

The Cover Layer During Rotation gives the required zoom setting of the current layer to cover a layer of its given zoom setting during a rotation.

Layer Support Information. Removed. In its place are the new tools Width & Height and Modifier Zoom.

Numerous minor data arrangements within various tools were also made.

OVERVIEW


 The Tools for ProShow include the following:

1)  Cropping Tool. Obtain cropping dimensions for a layer for a specific aspect. A sophisticated too that far exceeds the limited capabilities of the ProShow cropping feature.. PSG/PSP.

2)  Distances. Move a layer along the line of an angle of rotation for a specified distance or along a line perpendicular to that angle of rotation for a specified distance. PSG/PSP.

3)  Find Halfway Point. Find the slide location point located halfway between two layers given their Starting and Ending locations (X-Axis and Y-Axis). PSG/PSP.

4)  Findings. Exploits the relationships between pan, zoom, and rotate center, layer width and height. PSG/PSP. Note that PSG zoom values are always the same for each axis.

  1. Align Here. Position a layer’s side, corner, or center to a specific screen location.
  2. Calculated Settings. Pan, Zoom, and Rotate Center functions are interrelated. So, when two function values are known, deriving the missing function’s value is possible. This section calculates the value of the unknown function.
  3. Cover Layer During Rotation. Sometimes you will want to rotate a layer over the top of another, completely obscuring it from view. This tool provides information to do just that It gives the minimum zoom values necessary to cover the layer and what its width is while it is doing that.
  4. Layer Width and Height. ProShow provides no layer width or height information directly. You must make some assumptions or a bit of math if you need that information. This section provides this information. (NEW)
  5. Largest Width During Rotation. Sometimes you need to know what the largest width of a layer is when rotated at a given zoom setting. This tool provides that information. (NEW)
  6. Locations. This gives the screen location of a layer, its side, or its corner. This information is provided for a given Rotation on some portion of the layer.
  7. ProShow Settings. Layer values from ProShow layer settings.

5) Layer Information. This provides the slideshow’s layer information. There are three layers provided in this section. The section provides each of the three ProsShow Layers with dimensions (to identify the layer’s aspect) and associated scale. This tool’s information is also used by other tools: Findings, Cropping, Width & Height, Distances, Proportional Sizing and Placement: Layer 4, Layer: Outlines and Frames, Slide Information. PSG/PSP.

6)  Layer: Outlines/Frames. This tool gives settings required of a layer to give another layer the appearance of an outline. An outline typically has an equal size on each side of the layer. It also gives settings for an outline that creates the look of a Polaroid Photo (a larger outline section either at the layer top or bottom than on the other two sides). The tool provides zoom and modifier settings for creating a size change via the zoom feature versus changing the layer’s zoom directly. There is also a section that gives settings that allow a layer size change via cropping, a graphic editor, or the ProShow create Layer (Solid/Gradient) feature: Frame Creation Helper (for Bitmap Editors). This feature allows the creation of an outline or frame layer within ProShow Gold.   Cropping of an existing layer or creating a graphic of a specific aspect for use in PSG may be required to achieve results that are otherwise only possible from within PSP. PSG/PSP.

7)  Modifier Rotation Calculation. Find the rotation value in terms of degrees, phase change, or modifier value. Modifiers make rotation changes in terms of a percent of a rotation. This tool makes choosing the appropriate rotation amount easy. PSP

8)  Modifier Zoom. This tool calculates the missing value when given two of three values: Starting Zoom, Ending Zoom, and Modifier. This tool works for either a layer’s single axis or both axes. PSP. (NEW)

9)  Position a Rotated Layer. Given a starting and final location, this tool gives the distance a layer has moved. When Desired Final Position is provided (for a layer that has been tilted — either vertical or horizontal) or rotated, the layer’s pan settings to position the layer at that desired location are provided. PSG/PSP.

10) Proportional Sizing and Placement: Layer 4. This tool is useful for creating a layer that is proportional in size and location to another layer. PSG/PSP.

11)  Quadratic/Linear Function. This section provides answers for the ProShow modifier functions of Quadratic Curve and Linear Ramp. The quadratic curve uses an equation that defines a parabola. The ProShow factors define a region of that curve to position a layer. When the Quadratic Curve’s first factor (the quadratic factor) is set to zero, the effective equation defines the Linear Ramp. A linear equation defines a sloped line (which can also be defined as “ramp”). PSP.

12)  Slide Information. This provides the slideshow’s Frame Aspect and the Safe Zone size. This information is used by other Tools For ProShow tools: Layer Information, Findings, Width & Height, Distances, Proportional Sizing and Placement: Layer 4, Layer: Outlines and Frames. PSG/PSP.

13)  Time: Show/Slide/Keyframe. Giving a Starting time (minutes and seconds) and a Final (or ending) time, a difference in time is calculated. Some modifier functions have the ability to start at the following three locations: Show, Slide, or Keyframe. As it can be important to know the actual start time at any given location because of the function used and it’s value at that time can be calculated. PSG/PSP. Usefulness within PSG is very limited.

14)  Text Layer Text Positioning. Captions use a different positioning system than Layers do. Text layers are layers on which captions have been placed. As such, they have the benefits and characteristics of both Layers and Captions. A text layer caption is positioned on the layer using caption positioning. The text layer is positioned as a layer is positioned. Therefore, the actual position of that text might need some calculation. This tool provides that information to give TEXT POSITION or SCREEN POSITION. To get text position, the Layer Pan value and the desired Screen location are needed. To get the screen position, the Layer Pan and the Text Position information is needed. PSP.

15)  USER Calculations. This section allows you to make calculations or use the contents of results found within the worksheet to create other calculations you can use for a variety of purposes. PSG/PSP.

16)  Width & Height.  This tool asks for the following information: frame aspect, layer aspect, and layer scale.  If the zoom is provided, the tool calculates the width and/or height. If the width and/or height is provided, the associated zoom value is provided. This can be helpful when dealing with v8’s text region that you want constrained to a specific size and/or aspect. PSG/PSP. (NEW)

NOTES:
PSG: ProShow Gold
PSP: ProShow Producer

161018-2130 DLF-FPVP

FPVP Tools (Updated)

THEY’RE HERE! A few months back, I was asked if there was a way to reset the FPVP Layers values from the one’s entered. At the time, all settings changes depended on whatever values were entered. To set them all to a zero value was done manually. Also, a reset function would have required the use of a macro, a feature I hadn’t used for many years. But, I looked into it and one thing led to another. In the end, I made over 60 changes or tweaks to the existing program. I improved the functionality of the OpenOffice version which then were made compatible with LibreOffice (another freeware version of an alternative to Microsoft Excel). I enhanced the features of the Cropping Tool, Equal Size Changes, and Modifier Rotation Calculation.  I also added a tool that made it easier to figure out where a text layer’s text was on-screen. A text layer’s text is movable independent of the layer’s position. So, I created the tool to give me control I didn’t have previously. I let the tool tell me the screen pan values of the text given the text layer’s position and the position of the text on that layer. But it works both ways too. The position of the text on the text layer is given when you tell it where on the screen you want that text for a given position of the text layer.

This update (v10.11d) contains many changes and tweaks to the originally released version. Below are the main changes to FPVP Tools.

Cropping Tool. The aspect to which you want to crop a layer is now either manually entered or selected from a dropdown list of defined aspects. Also, a Zoom% feature was added. This is useful for cases where you are cropping a defined region of a layer within ProShow and you want to define it as a percent of the full sized image. Alternatively, if you create a crop region within ProShow, this zoom setting can be changed until one of the axis reports a size similar to what you have in ProShow. This will then give you the proper crop values for each axis that give the desired Aspect. Likewise you could keep the zoom at 1000% and enter the ProShow crop region’s values to obtain the crop values for the desired aspect. What is provided now are additional options that, hopefully, make the task of cropping your ProShow layer easier and more informative.

Equal Size Changes. Previously, the X and Y axes were required to have the same zoom setting. Now, they may have different values of zoom. You can now select the exact amount of change you want on all sides (scaled to the layer’s aspect). This change may be as small or as large as you want. Previously, the amount of change was made by entering a percent of change from the layer’s existing zoom value or as a specific value of zoom. These changes work for any size of zoom on any axis or scale of the layer.  The effective aspect of the layer before and after any changes is now displayed. This could be useful information for some situations. More useful information is the layer’s width and height before and after any changes. Further, the amount of change on each side (normalized to the frame aspect) is displayed.  This shows how large the change is on each side of the layer. The actual change on each side is also displayed for reference purposes as is the total change in width and height.

Note that this tool was specifically created to address the limitations in ProShow’s layer’s outlining and shadowing features. Add to that the fact that a 10% change in zoom size of a layer that is NOT square can result in a visual change that is larger in one axis than another. Visually, this is can result in some glaring disparities.

Modifier Rotation Calculation. This tool was modified to allow finding a layer’s amount of rotation, change of phase, and/or amount of rotation. An cell was added to provide the “Master” layer’s rotation amount. Also, a checkbox was added to have the tool calculate the amount of rotation required for a layer to obtain the desired rotation angle. There’s also an option now to have the tool calculate the difference in rotation.

For instance, if the existing rotation (Layer) is set to 120, Rotation (Additional) is -360. The tool reports that the Change of Phase is -1.00, Value of Modifier is -100.00, and a Rotation (Final) is -240.  If a “Master” Layer (a layer that another layer will “follow” the rotation of) has an existing rotation of 45, with the Layer’s values as given, the layer’s final rotation will be a rotation value of 525 degrees (when the modifier of 100 is added to the Layer AND the layer is also following the rotation of the “Master” layer).

At the very least, this approach can show you what the final rotation value is given the Master layer’s rotation and the follower layer’s rotation value for a given offset rotation amount. The basis for each result is given to the right of each of the three different lines the user can use as rotation input information (in degrees, change of phase amount, or a modifier value).

Text Layer Text Positioning. (NEW!) This new tool compensates for the fact that a text layer is a caption layer contained in a normal layer. The caption is positioned in a different positioning method than a layer’s position is. A caption is positioned where the 0,0 location is the upper left corner of the screen and 100,100 is the lower right corner of the screen. Further, the center point of a caption is located according to the alignment setting for that caption (left or right). The top to bottom center point is still roughly the halfway point from the top of the first line of caption to the bottom of the last line of caption, adjusted by the amount of leading associated with the typeface of the caption. So, the position of the text of a text layer is determined by the text’s selected alignment type (left, right, center) and the top-to-bottom center point of the caption. This tool helps to simplify figuring out exactly what the normal screen coordinates are for that text when the caption text is NOT the default 50,50 position. Likewise,  if you desire to know how to place of layer’s caption at a specific place on the screen for a specific layer positioning, this tool can calculate that for you too.

MACROS. Macros were also added to this new version of FPVP Tools. These macros allow you to reset the Layer Aspect in the Layer Information and within the FINDINGS section: reset the ProShow Settings, Highlights in the Calculated Settings section, and the dropdown list selections in Locations and Align Here. Specific graphics provide the ability to reset all of them at once (The graphic associated with each layer under the Layer Information section) or separately (in the Findings section). Previously, when the language was changed, the dropdown list selection displayed remained displayed in the original language. You had to manually change each dropdown list selection. That no longer is the case. Select a different language and the dropdown list is refreshed to display the the default selection in the language selected.

OPEN OFFICE 4.1.1 and LIBRE OFFICE 5.3. The ODS worksheet works substantially the same as the EXCEL Version. The previous OpenOffice release version had some problems which have all been addressed. Libre Office did not properly import the ODS worksheet previously released and this has been fixed as well. OpenOffice and Libre Office are free spreadsheet programs that provide substantially the same capabilities as Microsoft Excel. If you don’t have Excel and don’t have the money to spring for it, OO and LO provide excellent alternatives that do NOT break the pocketbook.

SUMMARY. FPVP Tools provides the ProShow user a means to access ProShow’s power without becoming an expert on how ProShow performs its magic. It provides a means to do things that are otherwise impossible, extremely difficult, or very time consuming to do. If you have an inquiring and open mind as to ProShow’s capabilities, FPVP Tools is a way to save you time and effort to effectively display your images.

If you want to make effective use of ProShow’s rotate center feature, for instance, FPVP Tools is the only way to do it. FPVP Tools allows you to define a specific point around which to rotate or tilt a layer. Many layers may then use the same rotation point. At this time, ProShow does not provide the means to effectively use the Rotate Center function.

Effective placement of a layer, when precision is necessary is significantly enhanced using FPVP Tools. This is far superior to eyeballing placement of a layer and its support components, whether you use some form of “motion” or a static presentation (that is, when using the features of pan, rotation, zoom, or tilt).

FPVP TOOLS Update Coming

A revised release of the full version of FPVP Tools is coming in the near future. Time permitting, I hope to released in the next week or so. Those who’ve already purchased a copy of the FPVP Tools will receive the update automatically. I’ve had very little time

FPVP TOOLS OVERVIEW
For those of you unfamiliar with FPVP tools, it’s a set of tools I started developing right after I discovered how to effectively use the Rotate Center function back in 2010. Discovering how to use actually use the rotate center function for something other than rotating a layer on its side or corner opened up lots of possibilities. So, I kept notes. The tools I developed kept me from re-inventing things and helped reduce some calculations when creating effects within ProShow.

ProShow provides absolutely no way to effectively use the Rotate Center function for other than rotating a layer on its side, corner, or center. Beyond those limitations, you are on your own. With FPVP Tools, you can select the exact screen position around with to rotate or tilt a layer. Also, any layer can rotate on that same location. It doesn’t matter that the layers can all have different sizes, scales, aspects, or locations themselves. FPVP Tools tells you the appropriate rotate center value.

I now knew exactly what a layer’s height and width was no matter what scale or zoom setting. That helped with layer placement. Not all images I use have the same aspect. Sometimes I used those images together in the same slide. So, I created a copping tool to let me crop images to a specific aspect. That improved the look and feel of the images on the slide. While Proshow allows you to crop (and move that crop region around) a layer, it provides no feedback to let you know what aspect the layer is cropped to. It means you must perform the math to figure out the proper cropping amounts.

The rotation and tilt entry values are in degrees. But, when it comes to creating a rotation/tilt using a macro, you are entering a rotation amount in terms of a percent of a 360-deg rotation. So FPVP Tools has a tool to do the conversion calculation for you.

A new tool helps you determine the screen location of text on a text layer. The text on a text layer is simply a caption encapsulated on a normal layer. The text on that layer is positioned like any caption is: 0 to 100 from left to right and 0 to 100 from top to bottom. Then, the layer itself is positioned according to 50% of the layer being on each side of layer center. Sometimes you need to know specific information. For those times, I’ve created a tool that helps determine the actual location on the screen of that text. It can saves you time and effort.

Want to rotate a layer and then move a specific distance along the angle of rotation or along a line perpendicular to that rotation value? There’s a tool for that too. To do that manually in ProShow is a kind of hunt and peck method. When you need precision, the tool in FPVP Tools is the only way to go. It saves time, effort, and frustration.

And there’s more …

FPVP TOOLS REVISIONS OVERVIEW
A while back, I received a request for reseting layer settings. So, I took a look. This capability required macros, a feature I’ve had little use for over the years. After looking into it a bit, I included a variety of macros that achieve the desired effect. I also looked into other areas in which improvements could be made to the FPVP tools. I subsequently made 52 tweaks, fixes, and changes to the them since the last release. Some of the more visible changes:

The Cropping Tool was expanded to include a set of defined target cropping aspects. Instead of manually entering the aspect to which you wanted a layer cropped, you could simply select the desired aspect from a drop down list.

The Modifier Rotation Calculation was expanded to include the calculation of a difference between layer’s rotation values. It includes a Master layer entry to make it easier to calculate a modifier to follow the rotation of another layer by a specific amount. This might be easy to calculate manually, but this takes some of the guesswork, time, and effort out of it.

Resets. There are now 4 different resets provided. One resets a layer’s aspect, all of its settings, and the highlighters. Another resets only the layer’s settings. Another resets only the layer’s highlighters. The final one resets the dropdown box selections when the worksheet’s language was changed. Previously, a change in language required manually changing each dropdown choice to get the correctly displayed language.

Equal Size Changes.
1) Layer Zoom. Earlier versions did not correctly calculate the layer size change for each axis when the layer’s initial zoom settings were not the same. The previous release locked the Y-Axis to the X-Axis value, keeping the initial layer aspect unchanged. The upcoming release now allows different values of zoom for the X and Y axes. When the desired change in size is selected, the tool now correctly calculates both axes settings (zoom and modifiers), for any scale selected.

2) Exact Size Change. It is now possible to select the exact amount of change to each side of the layer’s center. Select a size of 0.01 or 5 or 20 … and the tool will correctly calculate the necessary values for the new X and Y axis zoom settings. When using a layer to create an outline for another layer, it is now much easier to select the exact width of that outline.

3) Width, Height, Aspect. This tool now displays the layer’s width, height and effective aspect both before and after the selected amount of change is displayed. This is important for those wanting more precise control over how their layers appear in ProShow. Controlling a layer’s width and height can be very important to the look and feel of a slide’s content from one slide to another.

Text Layer Text Position. As discussed earlier, this new tool allows you to determine where the text of a text layer is in the layer coordinate system. Or, it will tell you the text layer position for display at a specific screen location. Of course, this tool only works with a layer that has no applied tilt or rotation.

A number of changes were also on some look and feel, bug fixes, or minor corrective actions. This is particularly true of the OpenOffice version of the worksheet. That worksheet now also works within LibreOffice. Both of which are freeware alternatives to Excel. The look and feel or the OpenOffice version has been made to be as close to the Excel version as possible.

VIEWERS, ProShow Producer 5+ Styles

This has been a very busy year for me. Too, I took some time off to visit family in Hawaii on the island of Oahu. Needless to say, I haven’t spent a lot of time working or had a lot of time to work with ProShow this year. Still, every now and then, some inspiration keeps showing up and that results in the creation of an effect for ProShow. Along with that comes the requisite testing to find out what works as well what the final effect will look like. The result, Viewers, includes 6 effects for a total of 14 styles.

The TOURNIE effects (supplied for 3:2 and 4:3 image aspects; Vertical and Horizontal) were inspired by Tennis Tournament score keeping graphics used on TV. There are two different effects here, In one, the frame rotates horizontally and the other rotates vertically around the displayed image. As the frame sweeps across the image, it sweeps it away and leaves the next image in its place. This effect uses 2 images of the same aspect.

The NOTE-A-TALL effect (supplied for 2:3 and 3:4 image aspects) was inspired by previous effects I created. The portrait image is displayed at screen left with a caption located to the screen right. This effect uses the tilt function to move two framed panels (that are sections of the original image) across the screen. The two panels move along different paths. The caption moves INTO the panel as it moves to the right. It exits the panel as a different caption as the panel move left. The two image section panels recombine at the right to form the next image where the previous image had been. This effect uses 2 images of the same aspect.

ROUNDER and SQUARER are full screen effects. A circular section of the next image is swept into view over the initial image in Rounder. In Squarer, small squares come into view from a large square’s corners. When the small squares meet, they form the large square that shows a portion of the next image. In both cases, the next image portion is located at screen center.  Then the remaining section of the initial image folds into the screen, from a vertical line located at screen center, to reveal the full extent of the next image. This effect uses 2 images of any aspect.

2By2-TO-TALL (supplied in 3:2 and 4:3) comes in 3 versions. Each version uses 4 wide images of the same aspect. In each version, the image that will display at full-size is shown in a 2×2 grid, framed at screen center. These images move out of the way to reveal the full-sized image within the framed region. The 2×2 grid then moves back over the displayed image and the next image is prepared for view. The next image that will display is shown in full color while the remaining images are shown in grayscale. In Version 1, the images pan off-screen the same way they panned on-screen. In Version 2, they pan off-screen the opposite of how they panned on-screen. In Version 3, the images move on-screen the same way they moved off-screen (using the tilt function). Versions 1 and 2 have more than 8 additional built-in variations of how the 2×2 grid images enter/leave the screen. Version 3 has more than 21 additional built-in variations. That’s over 40 possible variations for the 2By2-To-1 effect! Experiment and Have Fun!!!


Link to FPVP VIEWERS

New Producer Styles: Flip Images, Pairs, Quadrature, and Twins

After months of working on a number of different effects, I finally finished them. Once tax season here began, I found myself with a very little time with which to dedicate resources. Hence, the release of them was considerably later than I had hoped. This was a very unusual year and free time was at a premium. However, many tweaks made to the initial effects made for a final effect that I believe was worth. These effects display images in a simple and compelling fashion. In the end, I had the following effects: Flip Images, Pairs, Quadrature, and Twins. In all there are 44 styles.

Each effect is designed for Widescreen (16:9 aspect) shows. Each works in ProShow Producer v5 and later. The effects are designed for use with images that have been cropped to an aspect of 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, and/or 4:3 (these being the most common digital image formats these days). Many SLR cameras take photos with an aspect that is close to 2:3 or 3:2. You may still want to crop these images to be exactly 2:3 or 3:2 aspect (instructions are included in the style itself). Many of the camera’s known as the “point and shoot” type, take images with a 4:3 or 3:4 aspect.

The TWINS effect was derived from an effect I initially created in September 2011 to demonstrate the effective use of the rotate center function. This revamped effect allows their use as a stand-alone effect or to match effects seamlessly to transition from one image aspect to another.

The other 3 sets of effects were created, in part, to help demonstrate use of my FPVP tools. One thing led to another and the Pairs, Quadrature, and Flip Images effects resulted. I found that some of these effects were better released as effects to use in an actual show.

Flip Images. The images flip and turn over to reveal the image on their backside. What’s different here is how the images do their flip maneuver. 12 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, 4:3

Pairs. Images break into slices which rotate and merge to become different images. The term “Pairs” refers to these slices rather than the images themselves. 8 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, 4:3

Quadrature. 4 Images are rotated around a central point. Those images are either 2:3, 3:4, 3:2, and 4:3 image aspects. Each Quadrature image has the same aspect. 8 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, 4:3

Twins (Slide, Swap, Split 1, Split 2) Pairs of Images Transition to another Pair of Images. The initial pair of images may have a different aspect than the next pair of images. Transitioning between aspects of 2:3 and 3:4 is a breeze! 16 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:4

150502-2000

FPVP Tools for ProShow – UPDATE

FULL VERSION, Freebie Version

Ok, as promised, the latest version of the FPVP Tools has been released v10.9f. It is provided in XLS (Excel 97-2003), XLSX (Excel 2007 through 2013), and ODS (OpenOffice Calc 4.1.1). The addition of the OpenOffice format is new. OpenOffice is an Office Suite that offers an alternative to Microsoft Office but is somewhat compatible with it. It’s also FREE.

As stated in the previous post, Microsoft doesn’t support a number of key features I was using in my Worksheet. OpenOffice did a decent job of importing the Excel 2013 worksheet but, it did not translate everything perfectly … and a number of tweaks were required. I believe I got most of them.

With this release of the tools, I made quite a few changes. Each tool can help in creating effects in ProShow. They can minimize the amount of and intensity of planning that would normally be required. I also found a way to determine exactly where a rotated layer (rotated using the rotate function) was located on the screen. Rotate the layer on a rotate center and its actual screen location is determinable. This is useful for when you want to stop at a specific rotation value, then move the layer along the rotated angle or perpendicular to it without having to rely on a modifier. This is also important from the perspective that if you change the rotate center of a layer that is rotated on a rotate center tends to “move” or adjust its position if you change its rotate center. Knowing exactly where the layer is lets you swap out the current layer for a repositioned layer … and then do things that would be otherwise impossible to do. The effect would be extremely difficult to achieve in any other fashion … and not intuitively obvious as to how you actually achieved that effect (for those trying to duplicate what you did).

Another tool lets you find the physical location of a layer that’s been rotated/tilted (in increments of 90 degrees). ProShow includes the modifier functions of Linear Ramp and Quadratic Curve. This release includes tools to take advantage of those features. The Linear Ramp is actually a sub-function of the Quadratic Curve. The Quadratic curve feature is actually quite a bit more complicated than it looks. It defines a parabola … but the tools that ProShow provides gives you no insight into where on that curve you are for the values you use. The FPVP Tools of Quadratic / Linear Function graphs the values you provide and lets you actually see where you are on the curve or what the linear ramp looks like for the given values. It helps to design from a knowledge of exactly what is happening in ProShow.

These are the biggest changes but, a number of usability changes were made too. If you like to tinker with things, this is a tool that can help you ferret out the features of ProShow … features that ProShow has but which it doesn’t provide direct access to.

FULL VERSION, Freebie Version

FPVP TOOLS – Info Update

I know it’s been quite awhile since anyone’s heard a peep from me but, I have been busy. The “day” job has been pretty good at taking up most of my free time. However, in my free time I have worked on some effects that I created while working on demonstrations to support how to use my FPVP Tools. The development of those new effects are now mostly done complete. However, I’m in the testing and demo developing phase and that can take some time (due to the limited free time, doggone it). At present there are 4 basic effects that are comprised of some 44 styles. So, hopefully I’ll finish the fine tuning and tweaks soon. Then, i can start releasing them. I think you’ll like what you see when you finally see them.

I’ve also been hard at work improving and tweaking the Full version of my FPVP Tools. A substantial number of changes were made to the tool set last released. Importantly too, switching languages does not impact column widths as much as what occurred previously. As of now though, I believe that testing is mostly complete. I hope to have and an update in the near future.

Recently, someone asked me whether my Excel worksheet (in which the FPVP Tools were developed) would work in OpenOffice. I’d forgotten completely about that choice. A quick check revealed that every time I imported the Excel worksheet into OpenOffice, it acted a little differently. Seems the translation is not perfect. Further, Microsoft does not support a number of features that I used in the worksheet … effectively crippling the utility of any export to an OpenOffice format from within Excel (at least, for now).

All is not lost however. OpenOffice 4.1.1 imported most of the worksheet intact. I just had to figure out what it was not translating or was not translating correctly. Once I figured that out, it turned out the fix wasn’t anywhere nearly as bad as it initially appeared to be.

The FREEBIE version of FPVP TOOLS – Basic now includes an OpenOffice compatible worksheet.

The full version of the FPVP Tools still requires some tweaking to deal with some formatting issues and such. But, the main issues appear to have been resolved. I hope to have an OpenOffice compatible version of the FPVP Tools – Full available with next release. Hopefully I can do that in the not too distant future.

Keep tuned!

An Example of Using Two Different Scales in a Mask Set

Recently, I came across someone asking for some unique help. He was using two different scales in the same mask set: fit to frame for the mask and fill frame for the masked layer. He had two different mask sets that displayed the same image. One mask set was smaller than the other. The information concerning size and position of the smaller mask set were known as was the size and position of the larger mask set’s mask layer. What he wanted to know was how to determine the size and position of the larger mask set’s image layer such that it displayed the smaller mask set’s image exactly the same … just at a larger size.

An explanation (tutorial if you will) of how to figure out how to deal with this little doozy of a problem is located here.

ProShow Unleashed: Beyond the Manual

The FPVP book is now available:

http://fenimorephotovideos.com/BeyondTheManual.html

The book has gone through a slight name change from when I first announced it and there’s even more content too. The 97 page book is in PDF format.

Useful for both Novice and Expert users, there is something in this book for everyone. I hope you find it useful. The link above takes you to the webpage with the updated table of contents (no page numbers though). This is the first book of its kind for ProShow users.

Dale

 

COMING SOON! ProShow Secrets: Beyond the Manual

Photodex has created one of the most flexible and useful slideshow programs available. It strives hard to ensure that the program’s power is within a novice’s reach. However, by overlooking the advanced user, Photodex has obscured some of ProShow’s power. For instance, modifiers and rotate center were introduced in Producer 4 (December 2008). As of version 6 (December 2013), both powerful features remain almost completely undocumented. Further, the manual’s rotate center entry actually contains incorrect information.

Photodex would have you believe that modifiers are only for the advanced user. Perhaps so. By not documenting them, however, Photodex guarantees that only the advanced user or the really determined will try them. As for Rotate Center, it’s quite easy to use. Nonetheless, there are hidden relationships that, if known, allow you to create truly interesting effects. The lack of documentation hides some of the program’s flexibility and capability. This book aims to remedy that by telling secrets Photodex has kept to itself; secrets that can help make the program jump through hoops.

I hope this resource proves useful to you.

Below is the book’s Table of Contents. As you can see, a considerable amount of territory is covered. The material is current as of ProShow v6.0.3410. Keep tuned in!

Index Page 1

Index Page 4

Index Page 2

Index Page 3

Tutorial: Sliding Panels – Part 3 (Text Layers)

This is the 3rd of 3 planned tutorials on “Sliding Panels.” In this tutorial, I use the panels created in Part 1 as a backdrop for the caption layers. The intent is to show how to manipulate the text placement using tilt, rotation center changes, layer pan settings, rotation, and the caption position settings.

Text layers are unique in that the layer content is adjustable … that is, you can move it around without actually moving the layer itself. So, it is possible to use only caption controls or only layer controls or both sets of controls at the same time.

But too, there’s an awful lot of confusion over how to actually use these ProShow features.  This tutorial isn’t meant to represent a comprehensive treatment of text layers. However, if you master the concepts presented in this tutorial, you will have know how to effectively use text layers in your show. You will not need to guess about how to do something, you will know how to do it or at least have a very good idea on how to proceed.

The Menu Driven version (HTML 5): Sliding Panels, Part 3 (Text Layers)
The YouTube Version: Sliding Panels, Part 3 (Text Layers)

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Tutorial: Sliding Panels, Part 2 (Images)

The 2nd in the Sliding Panel series has been released. In this one, the panels I used in Part 1 become masks of images. These create image panels that fade from the initial image into the next image as they move toward or away from their tilt point.

The image panels maintain the perspective they obtained from their initial tilt while they move toward or away from their tilt point. It’s a practical example but, if you master the techniques provided here, you should find yourself with some handy tools for making more effective use of ProShow’s rotation center feature.

The full tutorial can be found on my blog here. You can also find the “Sliding Panels Part 2 (Images) tutorial on my website here or on YouTube here.

Dale

Tutorial: Sliding Panels

Not too long ago, I created a set of transitions (Miscellaneous 4) that had segments of a tilted image move while maintaining the perspective effect that the tilt gave them. So, as they moved away from the rotation center or toward it, they would change in size accordingly. It involves changing the rotation center as the layer moves. This is the first tutorial in a planned set. This forms the basis for the others. However, even by itself, it contains information on how to do things that you probably didn’t know could be done. The other tutorials will come along as soon as I find the time to get to them.

This has NOT been a good year so far … family emergencies have really made this a year not long to be forgotten. So, time has been very limited. Then, on top of that, this is a hectic time of the year as we here in the State’s reconcile our tax liabilities with our Government … and I’m one of those who helps other’s prepare their tax returns. Busy busy.

You can find the “Sliding Panels Part 1 (The Basics) tutorial on my website here or my blog here, or on YouTube here.

Enjoy!

Dale

SLABS, Transitions for ProShow Producer 5+

These things have been sitting around here for a couple of months now. FINALLY, I’ve finally gotten around to releasing them. These are a bit different from most of the previous effects … in these effects, rotation center is applied differently than the effects in the past. The hardest part was getting image at the end of the slab to behave correctly. Tricky stuff.

Still, the effect is nice and it is a pretty interesting application of ProShow features.

The effects use 2, 3, 4, and 5 slabs to move the previous slide off-screen and the next slide onto the screen. The previous slide is on the slabs side and the next slide in on the slab’s end.

http://fenimorephotovideos.com/Transitions_Producer.html?ifrm_Transitions=slabs.html

Transitions: Miscellaneous 4

I have been delving into more of the “mysteries” of the rotation center and experimenting with new ideas. Some things that seem quite obvious turn out to have some less than obvious aspects to them. So, while an effect may look simple, implementing it is less than simple.

In this set of effects are some called FauxTowers. These are an effect that initially started out as part of my initial 3D transitions. The result of the changes is a significantly different effect that makes the segments look kind of like a tower as they move around the screen. There are 8 variations that bring the next slide onto the screen and 6 variations that move the current slide off the screen to reveal the next slide. These effects make you want more.

Another set of effects are the Tilt n’Slide. There are 4 variations. These particular effects tilt the current slide as a whole or at the center. Upon being tilted, vertical slide segments move up or down the tilted slide to create the next slide. Upon being completed, the slide tilts back to fill the screen. The effect is quite nice at catching your attention.

A final set of effects are built upon panels. One effect, Panel Roll, rotates around the corners of the center panel, dropping panels at the corners and sides of the center panel as it does. Upon being completed, the next slide then resizes to fill the the screen. The next panels effect, Panel Slide, has 3 variations. A panel slides around the screen at an angle. As it moves in line with or perpendicular to the rotated angle, it drops more panels that create the next slide. When the next slide is complete, it rotates and resizes until it fills the screen. The effect is a very compelling way to introduce your next slide.

Tutorial: Pan Following, Part 2

This tutorial presents more information on how to pan follow. As given in the previous tutorial, Pan Following involves at least two layers: Master and Subordinate. The master layer provides the positioning information that the subordinate layer uses to adjust its own position.

In this tutorial, we apply the pan following modifiers, create the subordinate layer’s offset positions, enter the master layer’s travel path, tweak the subordinate layer’s position relative to the master layer, and (finally) making adjustments to the master layer’s path.

This tutorial demonstrates how easy and simple it is to create some complicated looking motion without a lot of keyframes or a lot of work. It also demonstrates that adjusting the motion of one layer does not necessarily mean adjustments to the other pan following layer.

Pan Following, Part 2 Tutorial

Tutorial: Pan Following

Time and again I see people ask how to “lock layers” in Producer. No such feature exists (or probably ever will) and even modifiers do not lock layers. While pan following modifiers come close, all they actually do is align the subordinate layer’s center to the master layer’s center. The layer with the modifier uses the information that modifier reads from another layer to adjust its own behavior. Pan following modifiers have the potential to save time and effort.

If you’ve ever tried to use a pan follow modifier with a layer that was sized at other than 100%, you might check this tutorial out to find out what to do so that it actually works correctly.

Pan Following Tutorial

MONTAGE FOLDS 2 for ProShow Producer

Not long ago, Someone the ProShow Enthusiasts forum mentioned how much they like the IPad’s IPhoto Origami theme. That resulted in the creation of the folding effects in Montage Folds. I started working on an additional set of folding effects immediately after the initial set was released. That resulted in Montage Folds 2.

This additional set adds 5 image montages and another 39 transitions. The number of transitions and their associated montage styles provide plenty of options for making some really nice, effective, and appealing image presentations.

So, all together, the full Montage Folds collection (Montage Folds and Montage Folds 2) is composed of 20 Image Montage styles and 93 transitions. Of the transitions, 27 are for Producer v5.0+ and the remaining 66 are compatible with Producer v4.5+.

The Montage Folds collection is composed of two basic montage types: A and B. The “A” styles break the screen into 3 equal vertical segments while the “B” styles break the screen into 2 equal vertical segments. Mixing and matching the various transitions among the montage image styles works really well.

The following demo shows each of the available Image Montage styles but only a small subset of the available transitions.

http://fenimorephotovideos.com/styles_producer.html?ifrm_1=MontageFolds.html

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MONTAGE FOLDS for ProShow Producer

Not long ago, Someone the ProShow Enthusiasts forum mentioned how much they like the Origami theme available on the IPad. I pointed her to a number of effects I’d already created which approximated what she was looking for. But, nothing I was oriented to a montage of images … they simply went from one slide to the next. So, I started working on effects specifically oriented toward a montage of images on a slide. Going was slow because I’ve been under the weather for nearly the entire month of August. Thank God for doctors!

Anyway, one thing led to another and I came up with the Montage Folds bundle: a set of 15 Image Montage Styles and 53 Transitions to go with them (PSP v4.5+: 31 transitions, PSP v5.0: 21 transitions). The number of transitions and their associated montage styles provide plenty of options for making some really nice, effective, and appealing image presentations.

There are two basic montage types: A and B. The “A” styles break the screen into 3 equal vertical segments while the “B” styles break the screen into 2 equal vertical segments. There are at least 2 different transitions for each style. But, mixing and matching the various transitions among the montage image styles works really well.

The following demo shows every Image Montage style but only a small subset of the available transitions.

http://fenimorephotovideos.com/styles_producer.html?ifrm_1=MontageFolds.html

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Images Hang Line V2 — A Variable Length Clothesline Effect

The initial versions of the 3 Clothesline style (Images Hang Line 1’s, Images Hang Line 2’s, and Images Hang Line 3’s) featured a large white border, like older Polaroid pictures. Within this frame, images could be resized and panned.

In this 2nd version, the large white constraining border was removed from the 3 clothesline styles. The images are now unconstrained by any mask. You specify the image’s final size.  All other features and capabilities are the same in this revision.

These effect’s flexibility (all 6 Clothesline styles) is considerable and unprecedented to any other Clothesline Effect:

  • An 8 Image carousel quickly becomes a 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 image carousel with a few settings changes.
  • Assign a caption to each image, if desired.
  • Change the images travel direction:  Right to Left or Left to Right.
  • Mix Landscape with Portrait oriented images in the same carousel
  • Add rotation and/or tilt to each image separately. Make them look like they’re flapping in the wind if you want!
  • Replace the clothesline (hang line) with a different one (or remove it altogether)
  • Replace the clothes pin (image holder) with a different one
  • Change the background to one of your choosing
  • Adjust the Clothesline (Hang Line), Image Hanger, and/or Images up or down on the screen, as desired

http://fenimorephotovideos.com/styles_producer.html?ifrm_1=Images_Hang_Line.html


Carousels V

Carousels V is a set of 8 styles for 4 different carousels, three of which are extensible.

Three years ago I created a style I called Lazy Susan, an extensible 4 image carousel that used portrait and landscape images in the same carousel. Lazy Susan 2 is a complete revision that improves upon the original by, among other things, adding the tilt feature to give a more 3D-like appearance while rotating the next image into view (while still retaining backwards compatibility to Producer v4), better image border/framing, and the rotation direction is now reversible. The update also made some name changes to the extender styles to make them more descriptive. The extender styles extend Lazy Susan 2 +1 (formerly Lazy Susan 2 Simple) extends the carousel by 1 image or while Lazy Susan 2 +3 (formerly Lazy Susan 3 Add) extends it by 3 images per slide.

I also created two other interesting carousel styles that use 2:3 aspect portrait images. 3 Image FlipStay flips through the 3 images in-place. 3 Image FlipRight is an extensible carousel designed for 2:3 portrait images, but accepts mixed image aspects. The images in this carousel flip while rotating into their next position. 3 Image FlipRight+ extends the carousel by 1 image per slide.

The last carousel, 5 (co)Talls is a 5-Image carousel that can display an extra 5 images next to each carousel image. They display over the carousel images queue. This variation is useful for displaying two different images in graduation, retirement, memorial, or birthday shows (for instance, a younger picture alongside one of the same guy today). Turn the display of the co-images off if you don’t want to use them. The side on which the images and captions are displayed is switchable. The style provides for 2 captions per image set (a carousel image with co-image or just a carousel image). Don’t need all 5 sets of captions? Turn off the caption(s) not needed (the caption box disappears too if both associated captions are turned off). The style accepts portrait images in the 2:3 and/or 3:4 aspect images. The extender style, 5 (co)Talls+, adds an image at a time to the carousel. Up to 16 variations are built into this single style.

So, take a look and let me know what you think.

http://www.fenimorephotovideos.com/styles_producer.html?ifrm_1=Carousels_V.html

FOLDS for ProShow Producer 5+

I was watching TV one day when I noticed a certain effect in a commercial. The Center Folding effects were the result of that inspiration. The Accordion Folds were inspired by the folding used in the Center Folding transitions.

So, there are 6 variations each of the Center Folding and Accordion Folds transitions for 16:9 Widescreen show in ProShow Producer 5+

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bO3hC0WMu6M

Find them here: Folds

ACCORDION for ProShow Producer 4.5+

I got an idea to slide some layers across the screen to see how it would look … simple idea for a simple enough effect. The result was pretty nice. The effect is simple, at least in concept (and in how it looks). Useful for a variety of different types of shows.

There are 8 variations of the idea in this set of transitions for ProShow Producer 4+ shows.

Find them here: Accordion

Images Hang Line — 3 Clothesline ProShow Producer v5+ Styles

Not long ago, someone at the ProShow Enthusiasts forum asked how to extend the Photodex Picture Line style to display more images. I do not have Photodex’s effect. However, its design made the obvious recommendations impossible. The images moved across the screen in time with a graphic that had holes in it through which the images peaked through. That made changes difficult. It meant that without the necessary number of images for the provided 5-image or 10-image effect, empty images holes were the result. Anyway, before I knew what the design limitations were I started working on my own version of the effect to see what the issues might be. After I discovered the design limitations of the original effect, I decided to finish work on my version. This is the result.

While the Photodex version is useable in Gold, this one is not. Further, these are only for 16:9 aspect shows. These effects are infinitely extensible: make each hang line effect as long as you need. There is a lot of flexibility included in these 3 effects.

The Images Hang Line 1’s version uses 2 images; extensions are added an image at a time.
The Images Hang Line 2’s version lets you use from 2 to 8 images; extensions are added using between 1 and 6 new images at a time.
The Images Hang Line 3’s version uses from 3 to 8 images; extensions are added using between 1 and 5 new images at a time.

In the case of Images Hang Line 2’s and 3’s,  just a couple of quick settings changes adjusts the number of displayed image from the default 8 images. In each case, the simple setting changes also let you add additional slides seamlessly. The direction of travel across the screen is user selectable: to the left or to the right.

Use portrait or landscape images. Give each image a descriptive caption. Want to adjust the tilt-horizontal, tilt-vertical, or rotation of the image? Do it for any image. In fact, a few simple adjustments can make the images appear to swing in the wind! If the default hang lines or image holders are not working for you, swap them for another.  Provided with these effects are 11 different hang lines, 10 short image holders, and 7 tall image holders.

Images Hang Line 1’s Demo

Images Hang Line 2’s and 3’s Demo

Find it here:  http://fenimorephotovideos.com/psp_styles1.html