Tag Archives: pan follow

Tools For ProShow (Update)

ProShow has considerable capability to which Photodex does not provide direct access. That is the domain of the expert, according to Photodex. So, if you want to access that capability, if you even know it exists, you are on your own. Tools For ProShow provide access to much of that capability. ProShow’s cropping tool is minimalistic. Its outlining capabilities are very limited and have not changed much since the program was first introduced. The rotate center function, first introduced in version 4, was meant to allow the rotation of a layer on something other than layer center. Photodex’s implementation provided access to points only within the layer boundaries. First introduced around mid-April 2010, the function has not changed since then. The program doesn’t tell you how wide or tall your layer is. That is something you must figure out for yourself, if you know how. When you rotate a layer on a rotate center value, ProShow does not tell you where that layer really is. The layer’s pan setting is based on where the layer’s center is … unless the layer is rotated off around a point that is different than layer center. The result is a misreported layer position. Sometimes it’s important to know exactly where that rotated layer is located.

Tools for ProShow addresses all of these issues and then some. When first introduced, there were only 9 tools in the toolkit. Now, there are over 25 different tools. Many of the tools are usable in both ProShow Gold and Producer. Only those tools related to modifiers or the case where a change in zoom occurs in each axis are not applicable. In fact, the Layer: Outlines/Frames tool provides the means to use graphics as outline layers similar to what Producer can do natively. It also gives tools to create a graphic that works as a frame. The outlining capability within Gold is next to useless.

I released a new version near the end of June. That was v11.21. I continued making various changes. 88 changes later, v11.33a was released. Some of the changes were cosmetic. Others were a re-working of the equations to provide more accurate information over a more diverse range of settings. For others, the tools were enhanced, becoming more robust. Many changes were under the hood changes.

A new tool was provided to tell how much space is to each side of a layer.

The Layer Outlines/Frames was significantly reworked. It should prove easier to use and understand. The Cropping tool was enhanced slightly. The Findings tools of Cover Layer during Rotation and Largest Width during rotation were reworked considerably. They now work for all scales and layer aspects. The Width & Height, Zoom tool was enhanced slightly.

Each layer has an angle that provides the widest presentation on the screen. This information depends upon the layer’s aspect. That information is now provided in the Layer: Aspect/Dimensions section and the Layer: Outlines/Frames tools. You never know when that information might prove helpful.

I hope you find the toolkit found in Tools For ProShow useful.

Dale
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New Producer Styles: Flip Images, Pairs, Quadrature, and Twins

After months of working on a number of different effects, I finally finished them. Once tax season here began, I found myself with a very little time with which to dedicate resources. Hence, the release of them was considerably later than I had hoped. This was a very unusual year and free time was at a premium. However, many tweaks made to the initial effects made for a final effect that I believe was worth. These effects display images in a simple and compelling fashion. In the end, I had the following effects: Flip Images, Pairs, Quadrature, and Twins. In all there are 44 styles.

Each effect is designed for Widescreen (16:9 aspect) shows. Each works in ProShow Producer v5 and later. The effects are designed for use with images that have been cropped to an aspect of 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, and/or 4:3 (these being the most common digital image formats these days). Many SLR cameras take photos with an aspect that is close to 2:3 or 3:2. You may still want to crop these images to be exactly 2:3 or 3:2 aspect (instructions are included in the style itself). Many of the camera’s known as the “point and shoot” type, take images with a 4:3 or 3:4 aspect.

The TWINS effect was derived from an effect I initially created in September 2011 to demonstrate the effective use of the rotate center function. This revamped effect allows their use as a stand-alone effect or to match effects seamlessly to transition from one image aspect to another.

The other 3 sets of effects were created, in part, to help demonstrate use of my FPVP tools. One thing led to another and the Pairs, Quadrature, and Flip Images effects resulted. I found that some of these effects were better released as effects to use in an actual show.

Flip Images. The images flip and turn over to reveal the image on their backside. What’s different here is how the images do their flip maneuver. 12 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, 4:3

Pairs. Images break into slices which rotate and merge to become different images. The term “Pairs” refers to these slices rather than the images themselves. 8 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, 4:3

Quadrature. 4 Images are rotated around a central point. Those images are either 2:3, 3:4, 3:2, and 4:3 image aspects. Each Quadrature image has the same aspect. 8 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:2, 3:4, 4:3

Twins (Slide, Swap, Split 1, Split 2) Pairs of Images Transition to another Pair of Images. The initial pair of images may have a different aspect than the next pair of images. Transitioning between aspects of 2:3 and 3:4 is a breeze! 16 styles, Image aspects supported: 2:3, 3:4

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ProShow Unleashed: Beyond the Manual

The FPVP book is now available:

http://fenimorephotovideos.com/BeyondTheManual.html

The book has gone through a slight name change from when I first announced it and there’s even more content too. The 97 page book is in PDF format.

Useful for both Novice and Expert users, there is something in this book for everyone. I hope you find it useful. The link above takes you to the webpage with the updated table of contents (no page numbers though). This is the first book of its kind for ProShow users.

Dale

 

Tutorial: Pan Following

Time and again I see people ask how to “lock layers” in Producer. No such feature exists (or probably ever will) and even modifiers do not lock layers. While pan following modifiers come close, all they actually do is align the subordinate layer’s center to the master layer’s center. The layer with the modifier uses the information that modifier reads from another layer to adjust its own behavior. Pan following modifiers have the potential to save time and effort.

If you’ve ever tried to use a pan follow modifier with a layer that was sized at other than 100%, you might check this tutorial out to find out what to do so that it actually works correctly.

Pan Following Tutorial